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San Francisco National Cemetery at the Presidio

Sponsor a Rose Bucket/Donate

A $10.00 donation will place a rose on twelve graves. The donation of $100 will sponsor a bucket of 125 roses to be placed on 125 headstones at San Francisco National Cemetery. A Remembrance Bouquet of flowers is included with each sponsored bucket.

 

By sponsoring you automatically become a volunteer.

Volunteer

If you would like to volunteer to place or hand out flowers please click the Volunteer button. For further information please contact the local event organizer.

  • We may need to call you to coordinate before Memorial Day Weekend
  • Invite your family and friends to join you

Michael Lobue

CORPORATE SPONSORSHIP

Memorial Day Flowers is an opportunity for your associates to show family members that the sacrifices made by their interred loved ones are remembered.

The Foundation encourages that sponsor associates and family members participate in the laying of roses.

On May 27th, the Sunday of Memorial Day Weekend, each volunteer will carry a Sponsor Logo tote bag with a bucket with 125 roses.

Each corporate sponsor volunteer will receive a bouquet to take home. Each bouquet will be accompanied with a flower food sachet and a care handout.

Each $10,000 sponsors 100 buckets, 1 bucket contains 125  roses.

15,000

2017 Coverage Goal

25,000

Veterans Graves

Sponsors

Logistics

2,000

Roses were donated in 2016 in a pilot program authorized by The National Cemetery Administration

200

Bouquets were donated for this program too

Map of the cemetery

San Francisco National Cemetery

On Dec. 12, 1884, the War Department designated nine acres, including the site of the old post cemetery, as San Francisco National Cemetery. It was the first national cemetery established on the West Coast and, as such, marks the growth and development of a system of national cemeteries extending beyond the battlefields of the Civil War. The cemetery is enclosed with a stone wall and slopes down a hill that today frames a view of the Golden Gate Bridge. Its original ornamental cast-iron entrance gates are present but have been unused since the entrance was relocated. Tall eucalyptus trees further enclose the cemetery. The lodge and rostrum date to the 1920s and reflect the Spanish Revival styling introduced to several western cemeteries.